Ghost Story

A Granny Tale

The evenings in the mountains were so peaceful that Christy almost forgot her fear of the dark until one night when the children convinced Granny Barclay to tell a ghost story. Christy and the children sit around the fire, their eyes glued on Granny Barclay as she tells the tale of evil betrayers who tried to escape the horrible deed that they'd done by sailing across the sea from the highlands to Cutter Gap. When Creed ventures to ask if the betrayers had managed to escape, Granny informs the boy that they died a horrible, vengeful death and that their evil spirits still roam the mountains. She tells everyone that some nights you can see their horrible hot breath rising from the grave and that if you walk by them, they'll grab you. After Ruby Mae jumps and emits a scream when Zack Holt scares her, Granny continues, saying that the hollow behind the old charter oak is the mouth of hell itself. Even if you manage to get past it, the earth will open up and swallow you whole and drag you down into a river of blood. As a finishing touch, Granny spits on the fire as lightening flashes through the sky. Zach informs Christy that spitting is good luck and Granny tells her that it also keeps the devil away. A frightened Mountie clings to Christy and she assures the girl that Granny's tale is only a story. Creed asks Christy if she's calling Granny a liar and Christy quickly informs the group that she isn't, that in fact, she thinks Granny's a wonderful storyteller. Sam Houston points out that Granny knows the best time to plant and the moon tells her when it's going to rain. As Granny turns to leave, she warns everyone not to stay out too late. In answer to her warning, a moaning sound comes from within the woods . . .

Inexplicable Beauty

As David and Christy stroll through the mission's moonlit yard, Christy wonders how she can teach the children to think when they are raised on fear and superstition. David assures her that Granny's tale was only a story but Christy points out that stories prevent the children from learning. David tells Christy that even the Bible says that some things are inexplicable like the way moonlight can make someone even more beautiful. Christy smiles and laughs and says that she may not be able to explain the Bible and moonlight but she can certainly explain a ghost story . . .

If Granny Says It's So It Must Be True

When Christy returns to the mission she discovers Ruby Mae busily dusting. When Christy enquires as to why she's doing housework so late at night Ruby explains that there is something in the air that is giving her nightmares. Christy can't believe that Ruby Mae could be scared with so many people there at the mission but Ruby Mae points out that she's not used to so many sounds in a house. Christy asks Ruby Mae how long her parents have been gone and the girl tells her that her father went hunting just before her mother went away to nurse her grandmother which was about half a year ago. Christy tells Ruby Mae to get ready for bed and offers to comb out her hair. Ruby Mae gasps at the idea and tells Christy that combing your hair before bed makes you forgetful. Christy dismisses the notion and tells the girl that she's been doing it all of her life. Ruby Mae points out that city folks don't have to remember all of the worrisome things that the mountain people do. If you forget when your crops are supposed to be harvested your house will fall down on you. Christy sits the girl down and tries to explain that granny's words are only superstition, for she surely doesn't believe that moon tells the lady when it's going to rain. Ruby Mae points out that Granny warned them not to plant potatoes in light of the moon and when they ignored her words, the spuds all ran to vine. Christy told the class that the moon makes the sea rise and fall and if it can do that then it certainly has the power to make a simple potato grow. Christy's response is interrupted by a howling from outside. Ruby Mae jumps up and quickly slams the window closed. Christy assures the trembling girl that the noise was just an owl and tells her that she can't go through her life being scared. Ruby Mae informs Christy that an owl howled that way when granny was born and her life has been nothing but a misery since. She gives Christy an acorn to put on her window sill to protect her from evil. When Christy wonders if Ruby Mae will be safe without it, Ruby tells her that she has an owl feather for herself. Owls are bad luck but their feathers apparently aren't to Ruby Mae . . .

Disheartened Delivery

Superstition is running rampant all over the cove that week and even Miss Alice jumps when Ben Pentland sneaks up on her while she's feeding the chickens. Ben gives a quiet version of his famous "United States Mail" greeting and hands Alice a couple of letters. Miss Alice wonders what's wrong with Ben as she can usually hear his greeting across the cove. She glances at the letters and notices that Ben has given her one addressed to the Allens and one to the Sears Roebuck Company. Ben retrieves them and admits that he gave Sears her recruiting letters. Miss Alice tries to joke about the mistake by asking when Sears became a missionary. Zach arrives with a letter for Alice that Ben mistakenly gave to his family and asks the man if he informed Alice about the birth of the five-footed calf. When Ben admits that he forgot, Zach points out that he only told him an hour ago. Alice is concerned for it is not like Ben to fail to deliver such vital news. She fetches him a glass of water and asks the man what is troubling him. He pulls out a little pouch and tells Alice that he paid Granny fifty cents for the charm and Susan still doesn't know he's alive. Alice wrinkles her nose at the smelly sachet and asks who Susan is. Ben tells her that he fully expected to go through life as a bachelor but when he saw Susan his heart sank down into his stomach and lodged in his throat at the same time. Miss Alice informs the pining postman that charms aren't the way to a woman's heart and asks him if he's told the woman how he feels. Ben tells Alice no, for he can't put two words together when he is around her. He gave her his special beef jerky but she still acts like he isn't alive. When Miss Alice asks Ben if he's tried food for the soul, the moony mailman thinks she is speaking of canned peaches. Miss Alice informs the lovesick laborer that food for the soul is poetry. She tells him that if you can't speak for yourself let the poet speak for you . . .

Logical Superstition

Inside the school, Christy writes the word "superstition" on the blackboard and tells the class that it is a belief that some action not logically related to a course of events influences an outcome. In other words, she says, when we're afraid of something that doesn't makes sense then that is a superstition and uses walking under a ladder as an example. Creed raises his hand and points out that it's purely logical to believe that if you walk under a ladder it could fall down on you. The class nods at his logical statement. When Christy proceeds to ask whom has seen a ghost, Ruby Mae raises her hand and starts to tell about her cousin's spirited sighting. Christy interrupts and asks for personal experience only. When no one in the class admits having seen a ghostly apparition, Christy asks why they are still afraid. Zady tells her that she's never seen the devil yet David tells her to be afraid of him. Christy tells the girl that particular situation is entirely different because it is written as so in the Bible. Zady concludes that if you can't see something but God says it's so then it's not a superstition. Christy doesn't argue with that logic and changes the subject asking the class if they've ever been to the charter oak after dark. The class is appalled at the idea and Ruby tells Miss Huddleston that no one ever goes there during the day unless they absolutely have to, much less at night. Christy announces that she is going to the charter oak tonight and would like all of them to come along. The class shakes their head no but Christy continues, saying that she will need their parent's permission to come back to the school after supper and tells Ruby Mae that she will need her help taking care of the little ones. Ruby Mae, brave soul that she is, tries to wrangle her way out of the job using her chores as an excuse but to no avail . . .

Nocturnal Visit

As Christy and Ruby make their way to the charter oak in the darkness, Christy wonders how many of the children will come. Ruby Mae isn't optimistic and tells Christy that probably only one or two will come as their mothers are afraid of what might happen to them. Christy tells Ruby Mae, who is tossing something from inside her pocket, that they'll just have to take this little trip by themselves. Christy grabs hold of Ruby and asks the girl what she is doing with those pockets. Ruby explains that she is tossing salt for protection then screams as she comes upon a headstone. Christy explains that the headstone is a memento for happy remembrances of relatives. Christy peers down at one of them and notes that it belongs to an Ebin O'Teale who died in 1756. She glances around at the other stones and notices that many of the others are dated 1756 as well. Ruby Mae begins to panic when she sees smoke rise from the graves, thinking that it's the breath of the betrayers. Christy explains that the mist is only swamp gas caused by leaves rotting on wet ground. When the lantern Ruby Mae is carrying is extinguished, Christy assures the frightened girl that she has nothing to fear. An owl hoots and a shadowy figure appears in the mist. Ruby Mae assumes that it is one of the avengers rising from the grave and promptly faints . . .

Fancy Meeting You Here

The man approaches Christy, who is perched beside the passed out body of Ruby Mae, and calls the girl by name. When Christy asks the stranger if he knows Ruby Mae, he informs her that Ruby Mae is his daughter . . .

Daddy's Home

Back at the mission, a revived Ruby Mae informs Christy that her father often takes naps at the graveyard when he's had a little too much moonshine. Ruby tries to make herself presentable for her father and worries that her dress is dirty. Christy assures the girl that she looks fine and tells her that her father will be so happy to see her. Ruby bemoans how she must have looked to her father last night but Christy tells her not to worry as her father wasn't in any condition to notice anything. Ruby starts fussing with her hair and Christy fetches a decorative comb for Ruby to wear. They hear a gunshot outside and run to the window in time to see Ruby's father whooping about his latest kill. David steps outside the mission to find Mr. Morrison admiring Prince. David is lukewarm toward the idea of the man exercising his horse but Ruby Mae assures him that her father is the best rider in the cove. Duggin apologizes to Christy for frightening her last night and Christy is surprised that he even noticed. Ruby Mae tries to impress her father with her clean appearance but he responds by handing her a freshly killed bird and tells her to clean it up so that they can head home. Ruby Mae is thrilled that her father is planning to stay and assures Christy that she'll come to the mission every day to help out. Duggin informs everyone that Ruby Mae won't be returning to the mission as she'll be taking care of him now. When a crestfallen Ruby Mae enquires about attending school, her father quickly rejects that notion telling her that she won't have time. He tells Ruby to go inside and get busy cleaning the bird. Reluctantly, Ruby walks toward the door and Duggin thanks Christy and David for taking her in. Christy assures Mr. Morrison that Ruby has been a great help and implores him not to remove his daughter from school. He tells Christy that it's a girl's duty to keep house for her father if her mother isn't around and tells Ruby that he'll expect her home tomorrow . . .

Jump Rope Jingle

Christy watches from the schoolhouse door as a group of girls sing a funny rhyme as they jump rope. One of the names, Ebin, catches Christy's attention and she asks Ruby if that was the same name that was on one of the tombstones. Christy remarks on the unusualness of the name and asks Ruby if it's common. Ruby says no and their conversation is interrupted by a fight among the children, who are picking on the O'Teales. When Christy wonders why everyone always picks on Mountie and Becky, Sam Houston informs her it's because the O'Teales are nothing but trash . . .

The Story Behind the Story

As Neil and Christy stroll through the mountains, she bemoans the fact that the children believe Granny's story even though she's tried to convince them that there isn't any truth to it. Neil disagrees saying that the story does indeed have some truth to it. When Christy asks the doctor where the truth is in the idea of sprinkling salt to keep spirits away he tells her that if salt can preserve food it can preserve people as well. Christy tries again, asking Neil to explain fence worms. The ever-knowledgeable doctor explains that if you build a fence at the wrong time the ground will shift giving the illusion of a worm. When an exasperated Christy asks Neil if he's always right, he tells her that is her department. Neil tells her that the ghost story actually has a historical basis. In 1750, a rumor made its way over from Scotland that the O'Teales had betrayed their own kind. Christy stops him at the mention of the word O'Teale and wonders if that is why the family is considered outcasts. Neil continues saying that betrayal of a clan is the worst possible sin imaginable so the evil betrayers left the cove to hide in the mountains. When Christy assumes they must have returned to the cove as there are no O'Teales buried in Cutter Gap Neil only says how interesting that fact is and wonders if there is some truth to the ghost story. Christy can't believe that the O'Teales are shunned for something that their relatives may or may not have done hundreds of years ago. Neil tells her that it isn't that simple and explains that the O'Teales have themselves to blame by keeping to themselves and the situation isn't helped by the fact that Nathan O'Teale is a bit of an ogre. Christy tells Neil that if they disprove the story then people will change the way they feel about the O'Teales. Neil isn't convinced and answers with a lukewarm "maybe." . . .

Manly Yes, Romantic No

Ben is reciting "The Shooting of Dan McGrew," to Miss Alice, a poem about an outlaw and his lady love. Miss Alice listens with horror to Ben's woeful words and tells the man his choice of material might be the reason Susan stopped him after the fifth verse. Ben is still confused about his lady love's reaction to the poem as the boys in the livery stable liked it so well they stopped playing checkers to listen. Miss Alice assures him that "The Shooting of Dan McGrew" is a fine, manly poem but it is definitely not suitable for courtship. Ben wonders just what it is that women want . . .

A Refining Lesson

Alice takes Ben inside the mission and prepares to teach him a few manners. Miss Alice lights the candles upon the dining room table which has been elegantly set. Ben plops down in his chair but when Alice clears her throat he jumps up and pulls out the chair for her. She places the napkin in her lap and admonishes Mr. Pentland when he proceeds to tuck his napkin into the front of his shirt. Ben feels that the napkin would be more useful in catching gravy in its original location but Alice tells him that he'll just have to endeavor not to spill any gravy. When Mr. Pentland tells her about the powdered hemlock that Granny Barclay gave him to put in Susan's food Miss Alice assures the man that he will not need it. Miss Alice picks up her silverware and a tobacco chomping Ben follows suit. She clears her throat and hands him a napkin which he promptly tucks into the front of his shirt. Miss Alice delicately points to his mouth and he spits the wad into the napkin and returns it politely to her . . .

A Hill and A Holler

Christy makes a return trip to the grave site and searches among the tombstones for the name "Ebin." When she finds it, she repeats the line in the rhyme that says "Ebin, skip that rope and look to heaven." She looks to the heavens and smiles when she sees a hill. She recalls the next line in the rhyme, which is "climb a hill and make her taller." Christy climbs the hill and recites the words "if she falls she'll give a holler." Christy stops when she sees a waterfall and notes that she wouldn't have discovered it if she hadn't climbed the hill. She recalls Granny's speech from the other night when she mentioned "a holler behind the oak." Christy realizes that holler (hollow) is another word for ravine and notes that there is a ravine behind the waterfall. Granny's words about "the mouth of hell" come back to haunt Christy and when an owl flies screeching toward her, she runs back down the hill . . .

Preacher, Protector and Fence Fixer

Christy walks to the water pump to fill her bucket and finds David busily repairing the garden fence. When she tells him that she is taking the children on an outing after school he points out that they have chores to do. Christy admits that the older ones do but feels that it would be a good lesson for the younger ones. She tells him that she wanted to let him know where she'll be so he wouldn't worry. David is worried now that Christy's told him that she doesn't want him to worry and asks where she's going. When Christy announces that she's going to the charter oak to show the children that they have nothing to fear David points out that she's already done that. Christy admits that it didn't work out very well the first time as no one showed up. But this time, she tells David, she's going to try again during the daytime. David offers to accompany Christy on her field trip but she reminds him that if he doesn't finish repairing the fence the pigs will get to the vegetables before they do. David insists upon coming along and tells her that he'll finish the fence later. Christy tells the persistent preacher that it isn't necessary that he tag along as he has other things to do. David tells Christy that none of the things that require his attention would be as enjoyable as accompanying her. Christy insists that she doesn't need protection for she is only traveling over the ridge and admonishes David for worrying. David admits that he never was the worrying type until he met her . . .

We're Off to See the Holler, The Wonderful Holler of Hell

As Christy and the children make their way to the graveyard she explains that many of the words in the jump rope rhyme are codes, things that people don't want to say in public or would like to keep a secret. She explains that they are going to the charter oak during the day so there's no need for them to be afraid. Christy stops when the group reaches Ruby Mae's house and tells the girl that she will miss her. Ruby Mae assures Christy that she'll see her for she plans to get up early to do her chores so that she can visit at the mission. Ruby Mae is sure that her father will allow her to attend school in time and Christy agrees and tells her that her father will be very proud of her once he sees just how grown up she's become. Ruby Mae runs off down the road with a burlap sack in her hand . . .

A Rhyme With Reason

Christy leads the children up the hill to the waterfall, reciting the words to the rhyme as they go. They ooh and ah when they see the waterfall and the "holler." When they come to a stream with a path of stones, they realize that they've solved the next part of the rhyme which is "if she stays upon her toes, she'll stay dry." The "break her nose" part of the verse has Christy confused until she looks up and sees a large rock in the shape of a nose . . .

Doting Daddy

As Ruby methodically scrapes an animal skin Duggin wonders when dinner will be ready. Ruby checks the pot on the fire and assures Daddy dearest that his dinner is prepared just the way he likes it. As Duggin cleans his gun, he notes that his daughter has taken on airs while living at the mission. When he tells Ruby Mae that she's neither smart nor pretty Ruby Mae contradicts him saying that she is, too, smart. Duggin laughs and asks his daughter what she intends to do with all of her smarts. Duggin tastes a sampling of his supper and shows his appreciation by throwing the ladle. Ruby Mae begs her father to let her return to school and tells him that schooling will make her more useful. Duggin tells his daughter that she can better herself by looking after the house while he's away in El Pano. When Ruby Mae asks her father when he's planning to return he tells her that her mother knew better than to ask that question. Ruby Mae informs her father that her mother cried herself to sleep every night waiting for him to return and that her grandmother's illness wasn't the real reason that her mother left. When Duggin responds by telling Ruby that he isn't the marrying kind she tells him that her mother hates the cabin because he is never there. Duggin picks up his gun and prepares to leave. When Ruby Mae tells her father that all he ever does is run away, he turns and walks toward her and strikes her across the face. Ruby Mae backs away and starts to cry. Duggin orders the girl to stop crying and her sobs become a whimper. He tells his daughter that she should be thankful that she has a father. After he leaves, Ruby Mae takes a box off of the mantle and puts it in her trusty burlap sack. She cautiously looks outside and after determining that her father is nowhere in sight, runs down the road . . .

Over the Edge

Christy and the children continue on their journey to discover the secret of the rhyme. They discover the line "half turn to the right find some stuff as black as night" refers to a cave. Sam Houston calls Creed a scaredy cat and pushes him down into the cave. Christy rushes to see if the boy is okay and urges him to yell as loud as possible so that they can find him . . .

Young Love

Alice is saddling her horse when Ben Pentland arrives and softly speaks "United States Mail." Miss Alice correctly guesses that his courtship of Susan isn't going as expected and Ben informs her that his lady love has found another love. Ben sighs and tells Alice that he should have expected it as the "lady" is only 17. Miss Alice pauses from her task, astonished that Susan is so young. Ben tells Alice that he expected the other man but was rather surprised by the bullet. He shows Alice his hat and informs her that the bullet went right through it and that he would have been shot at again if Susan hadn't stopped her boyfriend. Susan then proceeded to lecture Ben, telling him that he had no business courting her when her heart belonged to Joshua. Miss Alice tries to comfort Ben telling him that he will feel better in time. When Ben wonders how Alice handles her loneliness she informs him that the children are always waiting for them when they ride in as well as the shut-ins who depend on them to bring them the world. When they return home, there are always friends who are waiting by the fire and these people are family just as a husband or wife would be. Ben insists that it's not the same thing and Miss Alice agrees with him and tells him they should be thankful for their blessings. As they walk down the road, each leading their horse, Miss Alice tells Ben that he has a great deal to offer a woman. Ben agrees and proceeds to tell Alice a bit of gossip about the O'Connelly sisters in El Pano. Miss Alice stops him and tells him that she doesn't listen to gossip but the tale of Missy's rheumatism medicine is too tempting to ignore. She gives Ben permission to continue and they both laugh over the story . . .

Into the Mouth of Hell

With a lighted torch in her hand, Christy leads the children into the cave. When they notice the stalactites on the ceiling, Christy smiles and says that everything in Granny's story does indeed have a logical explanation. As they make their way further back into the cave, Ruby Mae becomes frightened. Christy suggests that the girl return home as her father will be worried about her disappearance. Ruby Mae assures Christy that her father doesn't care about her. Christy tells Ruby that her father isn't thinking clearly because of the liquor but Ruby Mae tells her that it has nothing to do with drinking. Her father would stay closer to home if she were prettier or smarter. Their conversation is interrupted by the children's raised voices and Christy hurries to see what the commotion is about. Creed excitedly points to a pool of rusty water and says that it is a river of blood. Christy tries to convince the group that the water's color is caused by minerals but is interrupted when Sam Houston spies a skeleton lying by the water's edge. Creed immediately thinks of buried treasure and moves precariously close to the edge of the ledge. Christy moves to grab him but loses her balance and topples down the ledge . . .

A Jewel of A Girl

Down at the bottom of the cliff, Christy gingerly removes her shoe and examines her tender ankle. She informs Ruby Mae that she'll have to go for help as the others are too young. She tells the girl to go back the way she came but Ruby Mae shakes her head and tells Christy that she'll never remember the way back. Christy assures Ruby Mae that she can do it and tells her to leave a trail of pebbles so that she can find her way back. Ruby Mae is still reluctant to try and tells Christy that she doesn't have any acorns with her and she lost her feather. Christy tells Ruby Mae that she was named for a ruby, a precious stone that gleams inside just as she does. The ruby is a good stone that protects against poison and bad dreams. She tells Ruby that she doesn't need a good luck charm for she carries one around inside her. Ruby nods her head in agreement, lights a torch, and begins her journey back to civilization . . .

Search Party

As darkness falls, David and Neil saddle their horses and prepare to search for Christy. David tells Neil that Christy insisted that she'd be fine and told him not to worry. Neil says that Christy, of course, would say that. David tells the doctor that they were on their way to the graveyard but couldn't possibly still be there. Neil admonishes David for waiting so long to start searching for Christy but David tells Neil that he doesn't want to waste time talking. Neil insists upon accompanying David and the two ride off in search of the fair Miss Huddleston . . .

The Saga of Carrot Top

Ruby is slowly making her way through the cave searching for the entrance. She hears a noise and holds the torch up toward the ceiling and sees a gathering of bats. Ruby Mae continues on her journey and finds herself at a dead end. She turns around and heads in the opposite direction and discovers a broken piece of pottery and an old yellowed Bible on the cave floor. Ruby Mae opens up the Bible and begins to read: "Jennie Revel brought us more food today. If'n her daddy finds out he'll whip her bad. He hates us O'Teales more than the rest of them. What a brave girl. Thank goodness for carrot top. Without her we'd be dead for sure. Lord knows how Jennie finds her way in and out. She's such a tiny thing but what a brave heart." Ruby smiles and takes the book with her as she continues her search for daylight . . .

A Windy Clue

As the sun rises over the mountains, Ruby Mae continues to search for the entrance to the cave. When her torch suddenly goes out, Ruby realizes that it was extinguished by a gust of wind. She follows the breeze and climbs out into the daylight . . .

Follow Me

When Ruby Mae catches up with David and Neil, she can't stop talking about her great adventure. Neil stops her and asks the girl if she knows how to get back inside the cave. Ruby assures him that she does and leads the way . . .

Braveheart

Christy and the children are returned to safety and inside the school Ruby Mae reads from the old Bible, the story of the O'Teales who hid in the cave when the rumor of the betrayer found its way to the cove. It was the redheaded Jennie Revel who secretly took care of them and it was she who made up the rhyme to help her find her way back to the cave. The ghost story was created in order to keep the others away but over the generations the ghost story and rumor of the evil betrayers had become one. After they went into hiding, the O'Teales discovered that one of them had indeed betrayed the clan. It was his skeleton that was found by the river, either killed by one of the others or killed by himself. Ruby reads the last passage in the Bible which states "we all got the fever and can't stay no longer." Granny finishes the story telling everyone that the man that didn't run away was hung. When Christy points out that the O'Teales still live in the cove, Ruby Mae tells her that Jennie managed to save some of them. One of the women was with child and the name was carried on. Christy notes that Jennie Revel was a brave girl but Zady tells her that there isn't a braver one than Ruby Mae. Granny remembers that Jennie married a Morrison and tells Ruby Mae that she was her great-great-great grandmother. Ruby Mae smiles and notes that Jennie was a carrot-top just like her . . .

A Father and Daughter Chat

Ruby, now the center of attention because of her heroic deed, is chatting with a group of friends when her father arrives at the school and orders her to come home. Ruby stands up to her father's demands and tells him that her responsibilities are at the mission. Ruby walks away as her father approaches her. When Duggin asks his daughter if those people are her family now she tells him that she would give anything to make them a real family but it's just not possible. Her father starts to strike her when she tells him that it isn't her fault that they can't be a real family and her father tells her that she's now old enough to make her own bed. He looks at Christy and David, who are watching the scene from the school steps and walks off into the woods. Ruby calls after him and tells him that they are still kin but her father keeps walking. Ruby hugs the tattered Bible close to her and notes that there are all sorts of kin . . .

Burial for a Betrayer

A few days later, the remains of the evil betrayer that was found in the cave are laid to rest. Christy is surprised when she sees how many people attend the ceremony but David makes her realize that they are putting to rest more than just a man. He tells the gathering that this particular O'Teale may have done some bad things but his family can't be blamed for his actions and their descendants 150 years later certainly can't be blamed either. He goes on to say that we each make our own way in this world and the word family means more than just who carries your name. Your clan is whom you choose to care for. After listening to this moving speech, Ruby Mae walks over to where the O'Teale family is standing alone and throws a handful of dirt on the coffin of the betrayer. The others follow suit and finally accept the O'Teale family into the community . . .

Caroline Kent